Las Piñas Nature Church

las-pinas-nature-church

NATURE CHURCH. In the vast concrete jungles of cities, we find modern structures that show deep respect for the environment and our culture. In Las Piñas City there is the Parish of Mary Immaculate, a church built within a modern residential subdivision.

It received a sobriquet as Nature Church because its architect used wood, anahaw, and thatch as main building materials and left the existing fruit trees and natural landscape, including the nearby creek undisturbed.

las-pinas-nature-church-moonwalk

las-pinas-nature-park-manosa

MAÑOSA DESIGN PHILOSOPHY.  The Nature Church verbalizes the design philosophy of Architect Francisco Mañosa who has been for decades championing indigenous Filipino architecture. Some of the notable Mañosa structures that we see today are the Coconut Palace, The EDSA Shrine, San Miguel Corporation headquarters in Ortigas Center, Pearl Farm Resort in Davao and the stations of Light Rail Transit 1 on Avenida Rizal.

At the Parish of Mary Immaculate, we immediately identified the Mañosa signature style in the church complex such as the pitched roof that is made of 40,000 interwoven anahaw leaves. This is a distinct design element and traditional material found particulary in the bahay kubo.

las-pinas-nature-church-by-francisco-manosa

las-pinas-nature-church-seats

FILIPINO CRAFTSMANSHIP.  Materials found in nature are the traditional medium for Filipino craftsmanship. Anahaw leaves are woven to become functional abanico. Wood is carved or left in its original form to become fine furniture and sculptures. The endemic capiz shells are placed within the grids of wooden-latticed window panels of traditional houses.

In the main church of the Mary Immaculate Parish, translucent capiz shells were fashioned into lanterns in the form of doves. The altar is made from a marble slab resting on dried madre de cacao driftwood. Logs and tree trunks were recycled to function as church pews.

las-pinas-nature-church-chapel

las-pinas-nature-church-san-lorenzo-de-manila-chapel

EPILOGUE. Beside the main church is a chapel with similar native elements. Here, we found flocks of birds resting on the huge madre de cacao chandelier and some stray cats sleeping on top of the organic pews. And just like the humans praying before a replica of the San Damiano Cross at the main altar, these creatures found a sacred refuge under the shade of interwoven anahaw leaves.

-2 November 2016
Día de los Difuntos

Published in: on November 2, 2016 at 2:18 am  Leave a Comment  

The URI to TrackBack this entry is: https://traveleronfoot.wordpress.com/2016/11/02/las-pinas-nature-church/trackback/

RSS feed for comments on this post.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: