Pasinaya Festival

Pasinaya Festival

FESTIVAL DAY. The mesmerizing dance of the Maranao just ended with a crash of a gong when performers of the Jota Batangueña began clicking their castanets and the dancers makes a graceful entrance to the improvised stage on the drop-off ramp of the CCP Main Theater. At the parking lot, the Philippine Madrigal Singers serenade the crowd competing with a marching band performing on a street-side while a post-Modernist artist greets visitors at the CCP bookstore. At the old Senate Hall, a children’s choir performs a Visayan folk song. In Intramuros, actress Mae Paner makes bubbles while tour guide Ivan Dy coaches children in playing traditional Chinese games.

All of these simultaneously happening at Intramuros, Luneta, the National Museum Complex and the Cultural Center of the Philippines in celebration of the Pasinaya Festival.

Cultural Center of the Philippines Pasinaya

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PASINAYA. At the start of the year, the Cultural Center of the Philippines gives a sampler of Filipino dance, music, theater, film, and visual arts by hosting the Pasinaya FestivalThis one-day event draws crowds of different artistic interests and it is held in different venues along Roxas Boulevard and around Manila. 

It’s good to start at the CCP Complex where spectators can avail of an audience pass to all of the participating institutions for a minimal fee. We avoided the long lines at main theater and Tanghalang Batute so that we could catch as many happenings as possible on that day.

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FREE ARTWORK FROM THE PRINTMAKERS. At the second floor of the CCP Main Theater, the Philippine Association of Printmakers (PAP) led by Benjie Torrado Cabrera demonstrates basic printmaking. The art of printmaking involves the process of transferring an image from a plate onto paper.

At the PAP kiosk, creativity isn’t restricted to the artists. Spectators line up to experience pulling out paper from a block of wood carved with an image and take home a free artwork from the Printmakers.

Jamie de Guzman CCP

Jamie de Guzman at the CCP

JAIME DE GUZMAN. During the festival, prices of publications by CCP were sold at a discount. We got the coffee table book Tuklas Sining from the CCP bookstore and asked post-modernist artist Jaime de Guzman to sign the page where his celebrated work, Gomburza is printed.

A recipient of the Thirteen Artists Award, de Guzman’s body of works inspires generations to reflect on our social realities. His distorted human forms and powerful strokes representing inequality and unrest as seen in his works during 1970s are as timeless and relevant in our current political scenarios.

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FOLK ART ON WHEELS. By lunch time, CCP is already crowded with spectators. We left CCP via the colorful jeepneys that transports passengers to other festival venues.

The Philippine jeepney has been traditionally known as a mobile art piece. Its loud and festive colors, chrome embellishments, plastic trimmings and chrochet curtain that hang along the windshield and a rosary dangling from the rear view mirror makes it an epitome of folk art on wheels.

Pasinaya Old Senate

Pasinaya National Art Gallery

NATIONAL MUSEUM. The folk art on wheels ferried us to the National Museum. After touring the different galleries, we were led to the old Senate hall where a children’s choir performed a set of Visayan folk songs.

Built in 1916, the imposing National Museum building was based from the plan of Daniel Burnham. Its original Neoclassical architectural is evocative of the Greek Parthenon which coincides with the American branding statement that the ideal government is founded on democracy. For several years the Philippine Senate held its sessions on the second floor hall until 1996 when the senate offices vacated the building.

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INTRAMUROS OF MEMORY. From the National Museum, we walked to Intramuros where a portion of General Luna Street was closed down to traffic. In Barrio San Luis, music is provided by a banduria ensemble. Makeshift stalls sell trinkets and handicrafts. Spectators are invited to create handicrafts and participate in the building of an art installation in the middle of the street.

This festive Intramuros recalls the pre-War feria on the feast days of San Nicolas and Sta. Lucia in front of the Recolletos Chruch, the June 13 procession of San Antonio de Padua at the San Francisco Church, the feast of the Sacred Heart at the Jesuit Church of San Ignacio and the Fiesta of La Naval de Manila at Sto. Domingo Church and the traffic jams in front of the Capuchin Church because of the pilgrims of the Our Lady of Lourdes. All the churches mentioned are long gone and can only be seen in old photos like the ones in the book Intramuros of Memory.

Pasinaya Bipoa

Te tit Pasinaya

BAHAY TSINOY. The audience pass allowed entrance to various museums. At Bahay Tsinoy, we explored the the different galleries exhibiting Filipino-Chinese heritage and artifacts. Ivan Dy of Old Manila Walks introduced the guests to traditional Chinese games Bipao and Tet-it at the museum lobby.

EPILOGUE. The annual staging of the Pasinaya Festival ushers the year with appreciation for art across different mediums of expression. Whether through dance, music, theater, film, and visual arts, Pasinaya leads the spectators into discovering the kind of art that goes straight into their heart.

Published in: on January 3, 2016 at 12:26 pm  Comments (1)  

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  1. Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

    From:”Traveler on Foot” Date:Sun, Jan 3, 2016 at 12:27 pm Subject:[New post] Pasinaya Festival

    traveler on foot posted: ” FESTIVAL DAY. The mesmerizing dance of the Maranao just ended with a crash of a gong when performers of the Jota Batangueña began clicking their castanets and the dancers makes a graceful entrance to the improvised stage on the drop-off ramp of the CCP “


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